If you want to talk ASUN smack or ramble ad nauseum about your favorite pro or major college teams, this is the place to let it rip.

Moderators: jcmanson, Sly Fox, BuryYourDuke

#627816
thepostman wrote: June 22nd, 2021, 8:05 am It will never make any sense to me how people who claim to be staunch conservatives that believe in the free market can be just as staunchly against young adults taking advantage of the free market to make some money.
It’s pretty easy to counter that argument in College Athletics. But I’m ok with this decision because the ideals that was college Athletics is so far gone it’s a whole different ball of Wax
TH Spangler liked this
#627818
But that isn't a good counter argument. The NCAA has essentially created this idea of what a "student athlete" is and isn't and people have just accepted it at this point and I have never understood why. Top tier schools make millions off these athletes and I see no issue with these young adults trying to monetize their talent.
#627820
this changes things. NCAA sat on it too long and have allowed this all to basically happen in the darkness. Now sunlight should be able to somewhat disinfect this whole process. create guidelines and staunch penalties for breaking the rules. The winners yesterday were the ones who thumbed their nose at the rules. Today, there are a lot of rich rich donors at hundreds of universities who are ready and willing to legally entice that 5 star to come to their school. I believe this along side larger playoff pools will bring about more parity in college sports, similar to the transfer portal. all things fuddy duddy's hate, but they also prefer their champions voted on by the AP poll.
#627821
I've had some conversations with people about what athletic departments could do to really leverage this. As a creative, it's super exciting to think through the possibilities for how we can help some athletes put some dollars in their pockets. I'm sure there are holes in each of these scenarios, but it's June and there's nothing else to really discuss.

1. Turn LibertyFlames.com into a true new media entity.
You can still have your box scores and stats, but we could pivot to a new media entity that houses podcasts, YouTube shows, and other things that give students a platform. You could launch the Liberty Flames Podcast Network and sell advertising on both the podcast and the YouTube version of it. Whoever is featured on a show would get xx% of the advertising revenue that came in from that show. These shows don't need to be studio quality like some of the stuff the tv side is putting out so you can produce more. Producing YouTube style videos of athletes instead of going to Runk and Pratt and filming the softball team playing bingo would be much more engaging content. More engagement = more money.

2. Help athletes create their own content.
We could buy 10-12 DSLRs with a Rode shotgun mic and set up some small direct to camera studios where athletes could sign up in 30-minute blocks to film their YouTube video. Then the athlete would be responsible for editing and getting it online. They already have the laptop and access to Premiere.

We would provide the space and the equipment. The athlete would determine what they do and when they do it. That allows fair access to everyone so athletes outside the ones on the official channel get an opportunity.

Doing those two things would be a combination of Liberty capitalizing on their brand and their official channels while still helping/allowing other athletes to do their own thing. Even within the Liberty Way, there are things an individual could do on their own platform that you couldn’t do on an official platform.

Thinking back to some of the video work I did with The LUnatics - there’s no way that stuff would get published on an official channel, even though we were within the guidelines of the Liberty Way. There will be athletes who want more freedom than what official channels can give, so providing them with the equipment needed would give them a leg up.

The students would be responsible for determining what their schedule allows them to do. They don't have to do any of this, but we would be giving them the opportunity to do it if they chose to.
thepostman, jmclaughlin liked this
#627822
keep in mind there will be required some level of balance. part of being a professional athlete is balancing what made you a pro and then participating in all of the perks that come with being a pro. and professional teams poor millions of dollars into helping rookies understand that balance.

Colleges will have to adapt. coaches will have to adapt. "i was late coach because i was filming a commercial for McGrath Honda"
#627831
thepostman wrote: June 22nd, 2021, 3:41 pm But that isn't a good counter argument. The NCAA has essentially created this idea of what a "student athlete" is and isn't and people have just accepted it at this point and I have never understood why. Top tier schools make millions off these athletes and I see no issue with these young adults trying to monetize their talent.
My company makes millions off of what I do. I get a salary and some commissions and a few perks. It’s easy to equate the free tuition, academic support, special meal, training etc as a fair exchange for the millions made off of their labor and likeness.
I just chose not to go to the mat and really make that argument
#627835
Then why even respond in the first place if you aren't willing to discuss? I do see your point about the other forms of compensation (free tuition, academic support, special meal, training etc) but in the free market one should be free to look for other avenues of monetizing their skills. Clearly that is how the supreme court sees it as well considering this is how they ruled.
#627836
Purple Haize wrote: June 23rd, 2021, 8:40 am
thepostman wrote: June 22nd, 2021, 3:41 pm But that isn't a good counter argument. The NCAA has essentially created this idea of what a "student athlete" is and isn't and people have just accepted it at this point and I have never understood why. Top tier schools make millions off these athletes and I see no issue with these young adults trying to monetize their talent.
My company makes millions off of what I do. I get a salary and some commissions and a few perks. It’s easy to equate the free tuition, academic support, special meal, training etc as a fair exchange for the millions made off of their labor and likeness.
I just chose not to go to the mat and really make that argument
This is where I am. No one is forcing these kids to enter these contracts. Like most things though, the optimal solution is somewhere in the middle. Maybe that means allowing players to collect ad revenue from places like YouTube, without taking direct payments from auto dealers, restaurants, etc.?This might help avoid some of the shadier activity.
#627837
if a kid is projected to be a superstar (lets be real, the people that will actually benefit from this), then college is basically forced upon them to reach the next level. (basketball and football being the larger revenue producers)
LU 57 liked this
#627838
When the professional leagues use the college ranks as their unpaid developmental leagues, you can't really say no one is forcing kids into these contracts.

In Europe, there are academies. Kids who are great at their sport can play at the academy level when they're 12-13 years old and get compensated while getting an education. The professional leagues handle those academies.

In America, our professional leagues use our colleges to develop players instead of paying to do it themselves.
thepostman, LU 57 liked this
#627839
Jonathan Carone wrote: June 23rd, 2021, 9:56 am When the professional leagues use the college ranks as their unpaid developmental leagues, you can't really say no one is forcing kids into these contracts.

In Europe, there are academies. Kids who are great at their sport can play at the academy level when they're 12-13 years old and get compensated while getting an education. The professional leagues handle those academies.

In America, our professional leagues use our colleges to develop players instead of paying to do it themselves.
Good point. Maybe if football and basketball were more like baseball, that would help? Specifically, if you want to go pro out of HS, go for it, but if you go to college you will not be draft eligible for 3 years.
#627841
Jonathan Carone wrote: June 23rd, 2021, 9:56 am When the professional leagues use the college ranks as their unpaid developmental leagues, you can't really say no one is forcing kids into these contracts.

In Europe, there are academies. Kids who are great at their sport can play at the academy level when they're 12-13 years old and get compensated while getting an education. The professional leagues handle those academies.

In America, our professional leagues use our colleges to develop players instead of paying to do it themselves.
Sounds like IMG Academy in Florida
#627846
LU 57 wrote:
Jonathan Carone wrote: June 23rd, 2021, 9:56 am When the professional leagues use the college ranks as their unpaid developmental leagues, you can't really say no one is forcing kids into these contracts.

In Europe, there are academies. Kids who are great at their sport can play at the academy level when they're 12-13 years old and get compensated while getting an education. The professional leagues handle those academies.

In America, our professional leagues use our colleges to develop players instead of paying to do it themselves.
Good point. Maybe if football and basketball were more like baseball, that would help? Specifically, if you want to go pro out of HS, go for it, but if you go to college you will not be draft eligible for 3 years.
baseball has a well established minor league system. NFL its nonexistent and NBA its currently marginal. Nobody gives a rip if a kid goes straight to the minors out of HS because he's going to be playing everyday against like skilled players.
LU 57 liked this
#627849
LU 57 wrote: June 23rd, 2021, 10:24 am
Jonathan Carone wrote: June 23rd, 2021, 9:56 am When the professional leagues use the college ranks as their unpaid developmental leagues, you can't really say no one is forcing kids into these contracts.

In Europe, there are academies. Kids who are great at their sport can play at the academy level when they're 12-13 years old and get compensated while getting an education. The professional leagues handle those academies.

In America, our professional leagues use our colleges to develop players instead of paying to do it themselves.
Good point. Maybe if football and basketball were more like baseball, that would help? Specifically, if you want to go pro out of HS, go for it, but if you go to college you will not be draft eligible for 3 years.
You'd have to vastly overhaul those leagues to make it work. The NFL wouldn't be safe for most 18-year-olds. What's the solution for the 18-22 year old before he's ready physically for the NFL? That minor league doesn't currently exist.
ballcoach15 liked this
#627854
Jonathan Carone wrote: June 23rd, 2021, 9:56 am When the professional leagues use the college ranks as their unpaid developmental leagues, you can't really say no one is forcing kids into these contracts.

In Europe, there are academies. Kids who are great at their sport can play at the academy level when they're 12-13 years old and get compensated while getting an education. The professional leagues handle those academies.

In America, our professional leagues use our colleges to develop players instead of paying to do it themselves.
Baseball has several levels of Minor Leagues. So much so it makes you wonder why there even needs to be NCAA Baseball
Basketball has the D League or whatever it’s called. Or they can go overseas.
Football is the only option being forced on College kids wanting to go pro.

Those are your major sports
#627856
Purple Haize wrote: June 23rd, 2021, 5:39 pm
Baseball has several levels of Minor Leagues. So much so it makes you wonder why there even needs to be NCAA Baseball
:oldhag Ballcoach answered this question several posts ago: "To get an education." Study
ballcoach15 liked this
#627865
How does LU max out it’s own national tv network and tie in ads that get our athletes revenue. That has to be an advantage/loophole for schools like Texas, BYU and LU to be able to monetize for their athletes on their own network. We used to do a lot of google and Facebook commercials for online - seems like every time we do one and our athletes are featured there would be a click count rev stream...even build in 2 second full team photo on an ad and stating we can offer revenue for every member of a team etc. creative capitalism will be fun to watch.
#627889
Purple Haize wrote: June 23rd, 2021, 8:40 am
thepostman wrote: June 22nd, 2021, 3:41 pm But that isn't a good counter argument. The NCAA has essentially created this idea of what a "student athlete" is and isn't and people have just accepted it at this point and I have never understood why. Top tier schools make millions off these athletes and I see no issue with these young adults trying to monetize their talent.
My company makes millions off of what I do. I get a salary and some commissions and a few perks. It’s easy to equate the free tuition, academic support, special meal, training etc as a fair exchange for the millions made off of their labor and likeness.
I just chose not to go to the mat and really make that argument
The equation is easy, but you’re missing a key component. In order to receive the equitable exchange of goods/services, the student-athlete signs away their freedom to make money elsewhere via their name, image and likeness - and actually grants that right to the school and conference. I’m certain you wouldn’t appreciate that in your current arrangement.
#627890
JK37 wrote: June 25th, 2021, 7:00 am
Purple Haize wrote: June 23rd, 2021, 8:40 am
thepostman wrote: June 22nd, 2021, 3:41 pm But that isn't a good counter argument. The NCAA has essentially created this idea of what a "student athlete" is and isn't and people have just accepted it at this point and I have never understood why. Top tier schools make millions off these athletes and I see no issue with these young adults trying to monetize their talent.
My company makes millions off of what I do. I get a salary and some commissions and a few perks. It’s easy to equate the free tuition, academic support, special meal, training etc as a fair exchange for the millions made off of their labor and likeness.
I just chose not to go to the mat and really make that argument
The equation is easy, but you’re missing a key component. In order to receive the equitable exchange of goods/services, the student-athlete signs away their freedom to make money elsewhere via their name, image and likeness - and actually grants that right to the school and conference. I’m certain you wouldn’t appreciate that in your current arrangement.
Several jobs require exclusivity. If they find you making money elsewhere you will be let go.
#627894
Jonathan Carone wrote: June 25th, 2021, 7:21 am In those jobs you often have negotiating options to get a fair - and often large - wage.
Y’all are gonna make me go to the mat on this arent you? :D :D

Getting a 40k /year scholarship is a pretty good exchange for goods and services rendered.
ballcoach15 liked this

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